@context for Trinity College Dublin MS 212

Last week, we went over how to write simple JSON to describe a manuscript object.  It wasn’t a perfect description (in fact, if you noticed, I used the same “name” in two different “name”/value pairs to mean two different things! I used “folios” to refer to how many folios the MS contained and which folios Piers occupied), but it was valid code.

"folios" fail

 

What I want to talk about this week is how to write descriptions in JSON that are able to be incorporated directly into a linked data framework.  Now, I’m going to talk at more length in a later post on linked data and the basic principles thereof.  To define it in brief, though, I’ll share this definition from W3C:

Linked Data is a way to create a network of standards-based machine interpretable data across different documents and Web sites. 

Today, I simply want to show you how to go from JSON to JSON-LD in a few simple steps that aren’t very much harder than what we did last time.

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