Linking CUL Dd.3.13 to the Digital Middle Ages

Don’t worry, this week is going to be much easier, in case you got a little fatigued last week with adding @context to upgrade your JSON to the high-falutin’ JSON-LD.  

In order to make JSON-LD worth our while, we want our data to be linked to other data, preferably data that is already available online. So today’s post is about how to signal within your own data connections to other data in other databases.  
 
Some of the key databases that are going to come in handy for us include:

  • The Piers Plowman Electronic Archive– The archive isn’t already live online, and it when it goes live online (which I hear rumor is immanent) it may or may not be searchable given its protections and access limitation and your browser.  Nevertheless, in dreams of the day when PPEA is open access, we’ll plan ahead and add any PPEA tagging we can. Without online versions, though, we are left with adding descriptions, or links to “sources” as described on the website. 
  • Manuscripts Online– is really a type of meta-database (yeah, really, a database of databases–see my review of it in Digital Philology here). Not all Piers Plowman MSS are going to return results that are any different from the other databases that will be linked separately, but eventually, we’ll want MSS online to be able to link to our data and this is the first step in building a two-way path. 
  • TEAMS texts at Rochester– again, here, we may or may not have useful links. In a few cases, an archetypal text has been transcribed and edited and is available in an online edition. Any time that there is a TEAMS edition of the MS we’re encoding, we’ll want to include that.  We’ll have a TEAMS data entry on each MS, though, to maintain uniformity across our data.  We’ll simply enter “null” for the value of “TEAMS”. 
  • The Index of Middle English Verse– also has limited utility, since not all MSS have distinct IMEV numbers.  There are numbers for archetypes, which is great because it’s how IMEV links all the works of a similar type together. But it’s less good for us because it doesn’t make distinctions between manuscript varieties.IMEVPiers IMEV is going to be more useful in the cases where a manuscript contains multiple works, in which instances we will alter our “contents” encoding to reflect the New IMEV/IMEP numbers of whatever texts have them.  (We may well have to claim some exemption for the Vernon, which could be a year’s work in itself.) I want to thank Matthew Fisher for his comment on an earlier blog for suggesting including both IMEV/IMEP numbers and LALME LPs
  • The Electronic Linguistic Atlas of Late Medieval English-is one of the more useful datasets that we can link our data to because it makes clear distinctions between manuscript contents, not based on the manuscript itself, but on the distinct Linguistic Profiles it gives to each different instantiation of Piers Plowman.  So, if you follow the data to its terminus, you end up with a description of the particular dialect identified in your Piers manuscript. I will say, however, that there is almost no way (at present) to link you directly to the LP through our data because of the architecture at LALME.  The only URL available is the overarching one for locating a particular LP, and from there you will have to use the LALME data provided as a reference to look up the profile in question.
  • MedievalScribes.com-is perhaps my favorite of all these databases because it has a unique page for each separate Piers Plowman scribe! Which is, honestly, just super exciting and interesting. Not every Piers MS has made it onto medievalscribes.com, but a very large number have, which makes it the single most useful database to link our data to.
Over the course of the year of encoding, we may well discover a few other databases that will be useful for linking to our data.  As we encounter these needs, not only will we add them to our data, but we will go back and add the point of entry
 entrypoint
to our previous data.  This is a very important step because it adds precision to the older data as well as uniformity to the data set. Thus, if we look at our Z content and find, for example, an entry that reads ‘”TEAMS”: null’ we know for certain that there isn’t a TEAMS edition of this text.  If we don’t fill it in, however, we can’t know if there’s a TEAMS text and we haven’t included it or if there isn’t a TEAMS text. Also, if we are asking a machine to read our data, we want all the pertinent information to be presented in completely uniform ways across all manuscripts so that if you run a visualization using only the “TEAMS” data points, the return will include all manuscripts and take into account those that don’t have TEAMS editions as well as those that do.
Some of the other kinds of online databases we can expect to encounter as we link more MSS to our data include:
  • manuscript catalogues
  • the LUNA database of illuminated manuscripts in the Bodleian Library
  • Manuscripts of the West Midlands
  • the archive of Early Middle English
Now, we aren’t really writing linked data yet. We’re going to talk about the building blocks of linked data next week. What we are creating right now is linkable data, which means as soon as we get the link architecture built, this data will be live. 
 
What this means for our data entry is that we have to think carefully about what links are going to become live–or linked–and how they’ll be linked.  In the case of LALME, it’s unlikely that the LPs are going to be any more linkable in the near future, so we’ll include a URL to the LP index and a reference number.  This is kind of like half-linked data. The link takes you half way there, and drops you off at the curb like a taxi.  It in no way takes you back to our data from the LALME LP page. When linked data becomes active in the most ideal way, all links take the user (whether human or machine) directly to the pertinent data and are traversable in both directions. Thus, if a machine is crawling the LALME LP, it would return all of our Piers MSS with that linguistic profile. This, of course, is a thing we cannot guarantee.  We can build our data so that anyone/-thing starting from our data set would be able to get to the LP of a specific manuscript and all the Piers MSS’s LPs, but in order for the existing databases to link back, we’re going to need them to also encode a link on their end.  Who knows, later in this project we might try our hand at getting one of these databases to cooperate and make their data linkable with ours.
 
Indeed, until we have the foundations of our linked data architecture put in place (more on that next week), the most we can do for our data is to include reference numbers wherever they exist, and terminal urls, wherever they exist
 
So, in the new code for this week, notice that I’ve added new information to two places
Screen Shot 2014-05-25 at 11.32.36 AM
 
In the body of the data, I’ve added LALME, Medieval Scribes, MSS Online, PPEA, TEAMS, and IMEV data entry points.  For some of them, particularly those that have a terminal URL I’ve added that URL as the value.
 
Screen Shot 2014-05-25 at 11.32.57 AM
In the context, I’ve added some lines indicative of my digital utopian thinking.  These lines are thinking forward to the way in which “IMEV” may eventually work as something that gives a context to the data down below. Remember, any data entry that isn’t defined in the context isn’t technically data that is linked.  It is simple data. It may be data that points to another resource, or data that acts as a reference, but it isn’t automatically linked.  Unless a type of data entry is defined in the @context, it isn’t machine-readable linked data. 
 
I am certain that as we learn more about how to link up with these different databases, this will change.  At present, the additional context is more of a place-marker than active JSON-LD.
So, looking very much like last week with just a few small changes, here is Cambridge, University Library MS Dd.3.13 described in JSON-LD. 
 

CULDd.3.13CULDd.3.13p2CULDd.3.13p3CULDd.3.13p4

{

“@context”: {

“foaf”:”http://xmlns.com/foaf/0.1/”,

“name”: {“@id”:”foaf:name”},

“MSshortHand”: {“@id”:”foaf:nick”},

“dcterms”: “http://purl.org/dc/terms/”,

“DateRange”: {“@id”: “dcterms:PeriodOfTime”},

“provenance”: {“@id”: “dcterms:provenance”},

“language”: {“@id”: “dcterms:language”},

“PhysicalObject”: “http://purl.org/dc/dcmitype/PhysicalObject“,

“PrintedEdition(s)”: {“@id”: “dcterms:BibliographicResource”},

“TEI”: “http://www.tei-c.org/release/doc/tei-p5-doc/en/html/ref-“,

“msDesc”: {“@id”: “TEI:msDesc.html”},

“msIdentifier”: {“@id”: “TEI:msIdentifier.html”},

“repository”: {“@id”: “TEI:repository.html”},

“msContents”: {“@id”: “TEI:msContents.html”},

“work”: {“@id”: “TEI:msItem.html”},

“title”: {“@id”: “TEI:title”},

“author”: {“@id”: “TEI:author.html”},

“DialectRegion”: {“@id”: “TEI:region.html”},

“publisher”: {“@id”: “TEI:publisher.html”},

“xsd”:”http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#”,

“date”: {“@id”: “xsd:date”},

“LALME”: “http://www.lel.ed.ac.uk/ihd/elalme/elalme_frames.html”,

“IMEVid”: “http://www.dimev.net/Records.php?MSS=”

“MEScribesid”: “http://www.medievalscribes.com/index.php?navoff&browse=manuscripts&id=”

}

,

“@type”: “PhysicalObject”,

“MSshortHand”: “CULDd.3.13”,

“HoldingLocation”: “Cambridge, UK”,

“repository”: “Cambridge University Library”,

“msIdentifier”: “Dd.3.13”,

“Olim.”: null,

“LALME”:7230,

“MEScribes”:364,

“MEScribesurl”: “http://www.medievalscribes.com/index.php?navoff&browse=manuscripts&id=364”,

“MEScribesid”: {“@id”: “MEScribesid:364”}

“MSSOnline”: null,

“PPEA”: null,

“TEAMS”: null,

“IMEVNo”: 2460-6,

“IMEVid”: {“@id”: “IMEVid:CULDd313”},

“IMEVurl”: “http://www.dimev.net/Records.php?MSS=CULDd313”,

“DateRange”: 1390-1400,

“Provenance”: null,

“AquisitionDate”: null,

“Material”: “Vellum”,

“SupportQuality”: 1,

“Folios”: 95,

“Script”: “Anglicana w. cursive features”,

“ScriptQuality”: 2.5,

“msContents”: [“Piers Plowman”],

“NumberOfWorks”: 1,

“PositionOfPiers”: 1,

“PiersFolios”: 95,

“PiersPercentMS”: 100,

“PiersTextVariety”: “C”,

“LinesOfPiers”: 7350,

“DialectRegion”: “Border Southeast Herefordshire – Northwest Gloucestershire”,

“LALMEGrid”: 359213,

“Collation”: [” i”, “vi”, “18 (lacks 1,8)”, “9-118“, “128 (lacks 4,5,6,7,8)”, “138 (lacks both)”, “vi”, “i”],

PassusMarkers“: [

{“( )”: “fol. 4r”,

“HeightInLines”: 4,

“Color”: null,

“Filigree”:null,

“Rubric”: “marginal-explicit passus pm9 de visione Pers le plouhmā”,“Line”: “( W )hat þe mōtayn by meneþ… “},

{“(a)”: “fol. 6v”,

“HeightInLines”: 4,

“Color”: “mark”,

“Filigree”:null,

“Rubric”: “explicit passus secndus (in the gutter margin)”,

“Line”: “( a )nd þene y knelyd on my knees…”},

{“(n)”: “fol. 8v”,

“HeightInLines”: 2,

“Color”: “mark”,

“Filigree”:null,

“Rubric”: ” explicit pass9 tci9 (gutter margin)”,

“Line”: “( n )ow ys mede þ mayde…”},

{“(s)”: “fol. 16r-v”,

“HeightInLines”: 3,

“Color”: “mark”,

“Filigree”:null,

“Rubric”: “hic explicit passus quart9 incipit pass9 qnt9”,

“Line”: “( s )eseth seide þe kyng…”},

{“(t)”: “fol. 18v”,

“HeightInLines”: 3,

“Color”: “mark”,

“Filigree”:null,

“Rubric”: ” explicit pass9 quint9/ incipit pass9 sext9″,

“Line”: “( t )hus y wakede…”},

{“(w)”: “fol. 21v”,

“HeightInLines”: 3,

“Color”: “mark”,

“Filigree”:null,

“Rubric”: “hic explicit passus sext9 / [hic] incipit passus septim9”,

“Line”: “(  w  )ith þat ran repentawnce… “},

{“(t)”: “fol. 27r”,

“HeightInLines”: 3,

“Color”: “mark”,

“Filigree”:null,

“Rubric”: “hic explicit pass9 septim9/ [hic] incipit pass9 octau9”,

“Line”: “(  t  )ho cam slewþe… “},

{“(t)”: “fol. 231v”,

“HeightInLines”: 3,

“Color”: “mark”,

“Filigree”:null,

“Rubric”: “hic explicit passus octau9/ [hic] incipit pass9 nonus”,

“Line”: “(  t  )ho seyde perkyn… “},

{“(t)”: “fol. 36r”,

“HeightInLines”: 3,

“Color”: “mark”,

“Filigree”:null,

“Rubric”: “hic explicit pass9 non9/ [hic] incipit pass9 decim9”,

“Line”: “(  t  )rewþe hirde telle… “},

{“(t)”: “fol. 41v”,

“HeightInLines”: 3,

“Color”: “mark”,

“Filigree”:null,

“Rubric”: “hic explicit visio de petro ploughman/ hic incipit visio eiusdem willmi de dowel”,

“Line”: “(  t  )hus y robed in russet…”},

{“(t)”: “fol. 45v”,

“HeightInLines”: 3,

“Color”: “mark”,

“Filigree”:null,

“Rubric”: “explicit passus primus de visione willm de dowel”,

“Line”: “(  t  )henne hadde wit a wif…”},

{“(a)”: “fol. 50v”,

“HeightInLines”: 2,

“Color”: “mark”,

“Filigree”:null,

“Rubric”: “hic explicit passus scdus de dowel/ [hic] incipit passus tcius [de dowel]”,

“Line”: “(  a  )las eye ad eolde…”},

{“(a)”: “fol. 54r”,

“HeightInLines”: 6,

“Color”: “mark”,

“Filigree”:null,

“Rubric”: “hic explicit passus tcius de dowel/ [hic] incipit passus qrtus [de dowel”,

“Line”: “(  a  )c wel worþ poute… “},

{“(a)”: “fol. 60r”,

“HeightInLines”: 3,

“Color”: “mark”,

“Filigree”:null,

“Rubric”: “hic explicit passus quint9 de dowel/ [hic] incipit passus sext9 [de dowel]”,

“Line”: “(  a  )nd y waked…”},

{“(t)”: “fol. 69r-v”,

“HeightInLines”: 3,

“Color”: “mark”,

“Filigree”:null,

“Rubric”: “hic explicit passus septim9 & vtmi9 de dowel/ [hic] incipit prim9 passus de dobet”,

“Line”: “(  t  )her ys no such y sayde…”},

{“(l)”: “fol. 74r”,

“HeightInLines”: 2,

“Color”: “mark”,

“Filigree”:null,

“Rubric”: “hic explicit passus prmus de dobet/ [hic] incipit passus secundus [de dobet]”,

“Line”: “(  l  )eue librum arbit’u qd…”},

{“(y)”: “fol. 78r”,

“HeightInLines”: 3,

“Color”: “mark”,

“Filigree”:null,

“Rubric”: “hic explicit passus secnd9 de dobet/ [hic] incipit passus tercius [de dobet]”,

“Line”: “(  y  ) am spes (3; spes boxed and once highlighted)”},

{“(w)”: “fol. 83r”,

“HeightInLines”: 3,

“Color”: “mark”,

“Filigree”:null,

“Rubric”: “hic explicit passus tcius de dobet/ [hic] incipit passus quart9 [de dobet]”,

“Line”: “(  w  )ollewerye…”},

{“(t)”: “fol. 91r”,

“HeightInLines”: 6,

“Color”: “mark”,

“Filigree”:null,

“Rubric”: “hic explicit de dobet/ [hic] incipit de dobest”,

“Line”: “(  t  )hus y walked & wrot…”},

{“( )”: “fol. 99r”,

“HeightInLines”: 2,

“Color”: null,

“Filigree”:null,

“Rubric”: “hic explicit pm9 pass9 de dobest/ [hic] incipit secnd9 pass9 [de dobest]”,

“Line”: “(     )and as y wente by þe way… “},

],

PublishedEdition(s)“: null

}}

}

 

 

 

Please do collaborate!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s